Virtual Integrated Design

The applications section contains files and tips on communicating and designing with assorted peripheral devices.

 


1I want to use RS232 Hex Com Tool v2.0 to test my modem.

Whether a modem is internal or external it uses a COM port. If the modem is an internal modem you can find the COM port it uses by going to "My Computer>Control Panel>System>" and click the "Device Manager" tab. Next, click on the "+" to the left of "Ports (COM & LPT)". You should now see the name of your modem and what COM port it is assigned to.

After determining your modem's COM port, open the port at any baud rate and type "AT" in the transmit window. Then check the "CR" menu item (your modem needs to see a carriage return after the data). Finally, place the transmit and receive modes in "ASCII" mode and click the transmit button. The modem should respond with" AT OK". This test will show that the general modem operation is ok.

To check the modem dialing capabilities, enter "ATDT" and then the number you want to dial (No spaces). You should hear a dial tone and then dialing sequence (If the sound is on).


Download Vid.scp file. This file is used for test 2.

2I want to use RS232 Hex Com Tool v2.0 to test my COM port.

If you have a standard loop-back connector plug it in to the COM port you want to test or refer to the on-line help file "Contents>Notes>Loop-Back Connectors" for information on how to make one.

In RS232 Hex Com Tool, open the port to test at any baud rate, (preferably the fastest). Place the transmit and receive modes in "Hex" mode. Click the File>Load Script menu item and when the window appears, navigate to the directory that contains the Vid.scp file and double click the file. Double click "AllHex" in the drop down list and a full range of hex numbers (00 to FF) should appear in the transmit window, separated by commas. Click the transmit button and 00 thru FF should appear in the receive window. If not, either the wrong COM port was selected or the port is bad.


Download Vid.scp file. This file is used for test 3.

3I want to test my Fluke45 precision digital multi-meter.

Open the COM port that your meter is connected to at 9600 baud rate, no parity, 8 data bits and 1 stop bit. Click the File>Load Script menu item and when the window appears, navigate to the directory that contains the Vid.scp file and double click the file. Select "Fluke45" from the drop down list and the following text should appear in the transmit window "*IDN?". Set the transmit and receive windows for ASCII mode. Also "On Key" should not be checked and "CR" should be checked. Click the transmit button.

The following text should appear in the receive window -

" FLUKE, 45, nnnnnnn, n.n Dn.n => "

nnnnnnn is your meters serial number, n.n is the meters software version and Dn.n is the displays software version. The "=>" symbol means that the last command was executed and the meter is ready for the next command.
At this point you have communicated with your meter, the COM port and window settings have been established. This is a good time to save the settings as a device profile. Follow the instructions in the on-line help file under "Contents>Files>Device Profile Files".


Download RS232M. This program is used with app 4.

4I want to use RS232M Com Monitor to log data to/from my modem (or any peripheral).

Two pc's are required to accomplish RS232 communication monitoring, the pc that is communicating and the pc logging the data. Typically, the monitoring pc is a laptop with a RS232/USB hub (most laptop's only have 1 port available and to monitor both sides of the conversation, we need 2). RS232/USB hubs are available from Ionetworks.

Refer to the RS232M on-line help file "Introduction>Begin Monitoring" for information on how to set-up com monitor and the pc it is running on. Begin communicating with your modem as in app 1.

That's it! You can save data in a simple text file with the registered version of RS232M. Saving the data organizes the data into sections for DTE and DCE that are time stamped and easy to read.

By the way DTE stands for "Data Terminal Equipment" and DCE stands for "Data Circuit-Terminating Equipment", coming from the early days of data terminals.


5I want to use RS232 Hex Com Tool to communicate with a PIC16C54 Micro and set the relays on VID's RS232 relay circuit.

You will need to build the relay circuit on a breadboard or proto board with a PC/Micro interface. Our links page has suppliers for those parts. Build 8 of the individual relay circuits on the board and connect them to micro connections D1-D8 and label the relays 1-8. To save money the relays and relay connectors can be excluded and the results could still be seen on the leds.

Next, you will need to cut, paste and compile the code on the relay circuit page or cut and paste the hex code into a file with a ".hex" extension. The code will then need to be programmed into the 16C54 micro.

Set RS232 Hex Com Tool for the port the relay circuit is connected to and set the communication parameters to 19200 baud, 8 data bits, 1 stop bit and no handshaking and open the port.

Type "0155" into the transmit window of RS232 Hex com Tool and click the send button. Every other relay and/or led should be on. If "01AA" is transmitted, the other relays/leds will come on and the first ones will turn off.




Home | Links | The Micro Stop | C++ Builder Stop | Hex to Ascii Chart